15 Ways to Pay Back Student Loans Faster

Second, you will end up making an extra month's worth of payments every year. What available reduced payment options do you offer other than forbearance? Only after all of that has been accounted for, you should budget out money for entertainment and luxuries. What steps do I need to take to qualify for these repayment programs? Follow the suggestions below to help speed up your student loan repayment. You may also be eligible for other benefits available to servicemembers, such as military deferment and Income-Based Repayment IBR for federal student loans. Federal student loans are loans made or guaranteed by the Department of Education.

500 Places That Have the Hardest Time With Student Loan Repayment

Extra payments? Make them the right way

Refinancing your loans is one of the best moves out there for paying off student loans faster. The goal of refinancing is to decrease interest rates, meaning more of your payments go toward paying down your . Oct 12,  · She finished paying back the $23, she borrowed in federal student loans within two years of graduating from New York University. Her fast-track approach saved her thousands of dollars in interest over the life of her loans. There are times when it is smarter to pay off other loans before student loans — if you have other debt with a higher interest rate, pay that down first, and it’s a very good idea to build an emergency fund of at least $1, as you start paying down student loan debt. But other than that, it can be really helpful to pay off your student loans as soon as possible.

2. Understand Your Loans, and Make a Plan

Your situation

Can you pay off your defaulted federal student loans? Are you confident you can make the full payment? When you consider your current income, loan payments, other debt and living expenses, are you confident that you can make your full monthly student loan payments?

Are you an active duty servicemember? Remember, you might also have other options. The best way to learn about all of them is to contact your servicer. Consolidation may be a good option if you're looking to simplify your repayment process. A Federal Direct Consolidation Loan can replace multiple federal student loans with one new loan featuring a single monthly payment.

However, it won't lower your interest rate or your monthly payments. Taking out a new Federal Direct Consolidation Loan will impact your eligibility for an interest rate reduction under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. To get started on consolidation, contact the Department of Education to find out if consolidation is right for you. To begin the application process, check out the consolidation website. You can also use the Department's calculator to determine your payments if you choose to extend your loan term and lower monthly payments.

This benefit applies to both your federal and private non-federal student loans and is available for all active-duty servicemembers, regardless of where you serve. Most borrowers on active-duty will qualify for this benefit, so it makes sense to start here.

You will be required to provide your servicer with proof of your active-duty status in the form of orders from your commanding officer. Learn more about the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and other benefits for servicemembers with student loans from the U. You may also be eligible for other benefits available to servicemembers, such as military deferment and Income-Based Repayment.

This is one of the best options to stay on the road to repayment for federal student loan borrowers. Income-driven repayment plans ties your payment to your income and family size. The chart below gives you an idea of your approximate payment.

For borrowers who will make a career out of military service, Income-driven repayment plans provide another major benefit— you may be eligible for loan forgiveness after 10 years of reduced monthly payments. If you think you will spend a decade or more in the military, it is important to enter into an income-driven repayment plan as soon as possible; each qualifying monthly payment gets you closer to Public Service Loan Forgiveness PSLF.

If you leave the military but plan to pursue another qualifying public service profession, like teaching or serving in government, you may still be eligible for PSLF. Get started by enrolling online at StudentLoans. You can also contact your servicer the company that sends you a bill each month about enrolling. They will likely ask for proof of your income, such as a tax return or pay stub, to determine your payment.

If you have an older federal loan made by a private lender, you may need to consolidate your loans in order to enroll in the income-driven repayment plan with the lowest monthly payment. Learn more about how this works here. For federal loans, consider IBR before options that postpone payment like forbearance or deferment. While completely postponing payment is an attractive option, if you enroll in IBR you can keep your payments low and, if you continue to make payments and continue your service for 10 years, your loan will be forgiven.

Use this chart to see what your approximate monthly payment would be given your income and family size under the income-driven repayment plans with the lowest monthly payment.

Check out the Department of Education's repayment estimator for precise amounts and more information. You are eligible to have federal loans deferred for a certain period of time if you are an active-duty member of the military serving in a military operation or national emergency.

Learn more about deferment for students, servicemembers, and other special situations from the Department of Education. Remember, military deferment doesn't make your loans go away—and can mean that you will owe a lot more once you reenter repayment. To get a deferment, contact your servicer and ask about this option directly.

Once you're in deferment, you can still make a payment if you get some extra cash. Most borrowers with federal student loans can choose to set their monthly payment based on how much money they make.

Income-driven payment plans provide the security of knowing that you can afford your payments. The plan caps your monthly federal student loan payment at 10 percent of your discretionary income. If you think you might be eligible, learn more about who qualifies for PAYE here.

You can get a lower payment if your federal student loan debt is high compared to your income and family size. You can learn more here about who is eligible and the differences between these plans.

You never have to pay someone an up-front or monthly fee to enroll in these plans. Student loan debt relief scams can cost you thousands of dollars and drive you further into debt. If you're not eligible for these plans, or if your payment is already lower than the chart says it would be, you may be able to find a different plan that reduces your payment. Remember, you might also have other options, like deferment and forbearance.

If you are currently in default on a federal student loan and plan to go back to school, you may benefit from a direct consolidation loan. If you cannot afford to pay off your loan in full, this is the fastest way to get out of default and restore your eligibility for federal student aid. Through consolidation, your defaulted loans are paid off by a new loan with new repayment terms. If you do not make any payments on your defaulted loan s prior to consolidating them, you will be required to sign-up immediately for one of the alternative payment plans available to all federal student loan borrowers.

Ask your debt collector for specific information about fees. The costs associated with bringing your loan out of default may vary substantially depending on your individual circumstances. Before you consolidate, make sure you understand the terms of this new payment arrangement and the terms of your new loan.

If you default again, your only option to get out of default is to agree to a repayment plan with your debt collector. Loan rehabilitation may be a better option for some borrowers; however, rehabilitation can take up to 10 months to complete.

Like consolidation, loan rehabilitation restores your federal student aid eligibility but will also remove the default notation from your credit history. And in some cases, it can be cheaper than consolidation. Under most circumstances, you have the right to pursue these options. Request information on both of these options from your debt collector or you may apply for a new direct consolidation loan with the U. Contact your servicer or debt collection agency immediately to learn more about your options and to make arrangements to bring your loan out of default.

If a debt collector refuses to offer you an option for which you believe you qualify, ask to speak with the debt collector's Special Assistance Unit. If your issue has not been resolved through the servicer's Special Assistance Unit, you may wish to review your options through the Federal Student Aid Ombudsman Group at the U.

When speaking with your servicer or a debt collector, be sure that you have written documentation about what federal student debt you owe. If you are concerned that you never borrowed certain loans, check the National Student Loan Data System. If the loan does not appear there, contact the collector and inform the collector of the problem. Remember, that system shows only your federal student loans, not your private student loans.

If you are currently in default on a federal student loan and you are interested in pursuing an option that offers the lowest monthly payment or the greatest benefit to your credit, you may benefit from rehabilitation.

If a debt collector refuses to offer you an option for which you believe you qualify, submit a complaint online or by calling Rehabilitation won't repair your credit completely—your previous missed payments may still show up on your credit report—but any default notation will be removed.

Your servicer or debt collector may ask you to provide documentation to demonstrate that you need a lower payment than they are suggesting. When negotiating with your debt collector, the law requires your collector to determine your payment amount based on your income; however, once you agree to a payment plan, you are required to make your monthly payment in order to rehabilitate your defaulted loan. Contact your servicer or debt collector immediately to learn more about your options and to make arrangements to bring your loan out of default.

Ask the debt collector for specific information about fees. Contact your debt collector to learn more about your options and to determine your pay-off balance. For some borrowers, this can be the cheapest way to bring a federal student loan out of default.

Your defaulted debt will be gone afterward, but it will continue to appear on your credit report as a defaulted loan that was repaid. By repaying your defaulted federal loan, you will restore your eligibility for federal student aid, if you chose to go back to school. Generally speaking, you have three options when dealing with the collector on a federal student loan:.

If you are currently in default on a federal student loan and cannot afford to make any payments toward your loan, you may benefit from a direct consolidation loan. If you cannot afford to pay off your loan in full, this is the fastest way to get out of default. Under most circumstances, you have the right to pursue this option.

You can either request a consolidation application from your debt collector or you may apply for a new direct consolidation loan with the U. Remember to ask your debt collector for specific information about fees. The costs associated with bringing your loan out of default may vary substantially depending on your individual circumstance. If you do not make any payments on your defaulted loan s prior to consolidating them, you will be required to immediately sign-up for one of the alternative payment plans available to all federal student loan borrowers.

You will also restore your eligibility for federal student aid, if you choose to go back to school. Here's some helpful advice to keep you on track:. Many servicers and lenders offer an interest rate reduction for those who set up auto-debit, which could save you hundreds or thousands of dollars over the life of the loan!

If your budget allows for it and you have already set aside some funds for emergencies, then you could consider making a payment for more than what is required. I am writing to provide you instructions on how to apply payments when I send an amount greater than the minimum amount due. Please apply payments as follows:. After applying the minimum amount due for each loan, any additional amount should be applied to the loan that is accruing the highest interest rate.

If there are multiple loans with the same interest rate, please apply the additional amount to the loan with the lowest outstanding principal balance.

If any additional amount above the minimum amount due ends up paying off an individual loan, please then apply any remaining part of my payment to the loan with the next highest interest rate. It is possible that I may find an option to refinance my loans to a lower rate with another lender.

If this lender or any third party makes payments to my account on my behalf, you should use the instructions outlined above. Please apply these instructions to all future overpayments. Please confirm that these payments will be processed as specified or please provide an explanation as to why you are unable to follow these instructions.

Borrowers repaying their private student loans may have much better credit than they did when they first borrowed for college. Unlike federal student loans, you may be able to consolidate or refinance your private student loans at a lower interest rate. Although consolidation and refinance opportunities for private student loans have declined since , a growing number of commercial lenders offer private student loan consolidation or refinance for creditworthy borrowers. Contact your servicer to ask about these options.

You may also want to check with your bank or credit union to see if they offer similar products. By releasing your co-signer, you will be removing your co-signer from their obligation to repay your loan. Many lenders advertise that a co-signer may be released from a private student loan after a certain number of consecutive, timely payments and a credit check to determine if you are eligible to repay the loan on your own.

I am writing to you because I am seeking the release of my co-signer on my loan. Please conduct a review of my account to determine if I am eligible for co-signer release. If you determine that I am not eligible to have my co-signer released from my l oans, please provide an explanation, including the following:. Do you anticipate modifying these requirements in the future?

Will any future modifications apply to me when I seek to release my co-signer? She has published numerous articles for print and online media including "Grit" Magazine. Burbeck holds a B. References Brendan's Student Loans. About the Author Lynn Burbeck is a professional writer with over five years of experience writing for the Web. Accessed 17 September Depending on which text editor you're pasting into, you might have to add the italics to the site name.

The government automatically puts federal student loans on a year repayment timeline, unless you choose differently. If you have a private loan, your repayment term could be shorter or longer. You can make an additional payment at any point in the month, or you can make one larger payment on the due date. If you qualify, a lender will replace multiple student loans with a single private loan at a lower interest rate.

Best student loan refinance lenders Federal loans offer income-driven repayment plans , which can extend the payoff timeline to 20 or 25 years. You can also consolidate student loans , which stretches repayment to a maximum of 30 years, depending on your balance. Or make a lump-sum interest payment before your grace or deferment period ends. How much will deferment or forbearance cost you? This simple strategy is a way to trick yourself into paying extra on debt: